At Ezra Pound

Drinking shiraz and enjoying the atmos

I discovered a new bar in town last night.

A bar that made me feel like I was in Melbourne.

Maybe it was the street art vibe…

street art

Maybe it was the fact I was out on in Northbridge with friends for the second night in a week.

Ezra Pound was of course a famous American poet at the turn of the previous century – I’m not terribly familiar with his work – a quick read of Wikipedia makes me think he wasn’t all that pleasant a chap – although in his favour he did convince people to publish one of my favourite poets – TS Eliot.

Do not move
 Let the wind speak
  that is paradise.
Let the Gods forgive what I
  have made
Let those I love try to forgive
  what I have made.
from Canto 120, Ezra Pound

 Anyway, the man himself aside, it’s a great little bar.
Loved the exposed brick, the couches and chairs inside, the outdoor seating, the decorated fence.
I missed it completely the first time – it’s down a little alleyway just a few doors down from The Bird on William Street if you’re heading towards the Brass Monkey.
Oh and speaking of monkeys… or rather Great Apes… we had a very lively discussion of the play we’d just been to see at The Blue Room – Wish.
If you’ve read the book by Peter Goldsworthy you’ll know why.
When JJ – the hearing son of deaf parents – agrees to teach Sign to the mysterious Eliza, he embarks on a voyage of discovery that takes him to the outer limits of language, science, nature, ethics – and love.
For me the play was about living in two worlds but fitting in in neither.
And it also raised the question:  Does love justify your actions?
I’m not sure it’s the get-out-of-jail-free card that the romantics would have us believe.
Have you read the book?  Seen the play?
What do you think?
Happy to be at this bar

3 Replies to “At Ezra Pound”

  1. I love that street art.
    I haven’t read anything by Peter Goldsworthy since Honk If You Are Jesus, and another one called (I think) Little Deaths.
    He’s not really my kind of writer. I tend to gravitate towards murder mysteries. (but not Agatha Christie).

  2. River, he’s not really mine either. I hadn’t read the book and I’m not sure I will now. The play (apparently) is quite faithful to it.

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